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Appendix 2Performance Statements 2016–17

Contents

Service Area: Transport System Investment Planning and Programming

Service Area Objective: To develop long term transport policies and plans for the future development of the integrated transport system and to plan and prioritise strategic investment in effective, efficient and sustainable infrastructure, systems and services.

Responsible transport system planning ensures Queensland's long-term transport needs are met in the most cost-effective way and that development impacts are managed effectively. This is achieved through developing and managing:

Service standards Notes 2016–17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual Status
Effectiveness measures
Percentage of projects in the Transport System Planning Program: T,1 - - -
commencing no later than four months after the programmed commencement date - 90 96
completed no more than four months after the programmed commencement date - 80 81
costing less than 10% over the programmed estimate - 85 94
Road system seal age (percentage of the state-controlled road network exceeding the optimal seal age) M,2,3 28.2 29.93
Road system condition (the percentage of urban and rural State-controlled roads with condition better than the specified benchmark) M,4 - - -
Urban - 97-99 97-99
Rural - 95-97 95-97
Efficiency measures
Administrative cost to plan, develop and manage the QTRIP as a percentage of the overall value of the program M,5 1 0.43
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

M. Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Minister for Main Roads, Road Safety and Ports and Minister for Energy, Biofuels and Water Supply.

T. Denotes services standards for which accountability rest with the Deputy Premier, Minister for Transport and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning.

  1. The Transport System Planning Program was formerly named the State Planning Program.
  2. The road system seal age measure is indicative of the level of risk to the preservation of the underlying road pavement layers.
  3. As at 30 June 2017, 29.9 per cent of the state-controlled road network (8700km) exceeded the optimal point in time for resurfacing to ensure waterproofing of the underlying pavement structure. This was slightly worse than the 2015–16 result of 28.5 per cent (8300km). Sections with old surfaces are at an increased risk of pavement damage during wet weather events. Within available funding, TMR proactively targets investment in pavement surfaces, and it is expected that the length of old seals will decrease over the next four years.
  4. The road system condition measure reports the surface layer smoothness of the road network from a road users' perspective.
  5. QTRIP is a four year rolling program of priority transport infrastructure works which is published annually. This is a new service standard developed to measure how efficiently the QTRIP is being developed and managed. It excludes Queensland Rail and Ports.

Service Area: Transport Infrastructure Management and Delivery

Service Area Objective: To construct, maintain and operate an integrated transport network accessible to all.

Activities undertaken in this service area relate to stewardship of the state road network and include:

This work is underpinned with technical expertise to mitigate risk and sustain the transport system's performance.

Service standards Notes 2016–17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual Status
Service: Transport Infrastructure Management and Delivery M - - -
Effectiveness measures
Road network efficiency – Average travel time per 10km 1 - - -
AM peak - 11.1 11.3
Off peak - 9.9 10.2
PM peak 2 11.3 11.9
Road network reliability – Percentage of the road network with reliable travel times 1
AM peak - 79 78
Off peak - 91 88
PM peak - 75 71
Road network productivity – Percentage of the road network with good productivity 1, 3 - -
AM peak - 72 70
Off peak - 76 73
PM peak - 71 66
Arterial intersection performance – Percentage of intersections congested less than 20 minutes per hour - - - -
AM peak - 87 84
Off peak - 94 92
PM peak - 82 77
Number of fatal crashes on State-controlled roads per 100 million vehicle kilometers travelled where the road condition was likely to be a contributing factor - 0.05 0.05
Efficiency measures
Administrative/staff costs of operating and delivering the department's Road Operations Program as a percentage of the total value of the Roads Operations Program (including operations, maintenance and projects) 4, 5 10 12.6
Service: Transport Infrastructure Delivery M - -
Effectiveness measures
Percentage of QTRIP projects >$5 million:
commencing no later than four months after the programmed commencement date 6 90 84
completed no more than four months after the programmed construction period 7 90 81
costing less than 10 per cent over the published QTRIP figure - 90 92
Efficiency measures
Administration costs of managing and delivering the QTRIP as a percentage of the current financial year's QTRIP allocation 6 < 5.1 3.8
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

M. Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Minister for Main Roads, Road Safety and Ports and Minister for Energy, Biofuels and Water Supply.

  1. Through proactive departmental initiatives, the status of the road system network is performing at generally the same levels, withstanding population, traffic and economic growth in the current financial year. The department will continue to deliver a number of road and motorway initiatives to mitigate increasing congestion issues driven by increased vehicle usage.
  2. This performance measure is currently just inside the amber assessment band (indicating a slight adverse variation). It is the first year that any of the road operation effectiveness measures have moved outside the green assessment band. Note that over the last five years, travel time during this peak period has increased by an average of over 1 per cent per year, which is less than half the rate of traffic growth over the same period. The fact that travel time during this period is the highest can be attributed to a number of reasons. The PM peak (in terms of traffic volumes) is general higher and wider than the AM peak (that is, more vehicles are travelling in congested conditions compared to the AM peak). This could be related to a wider mix of trip purposes, for example shopping trips and school pickups that generally occur earlier than the afternoon commuter trips, while increased congestion could also be due to other factors such as Queensland rain storms which occur more often during the PM peak.
  3. Good road network productivity occurs under two scenarios of performance: (a) speeds are in excess of a benchmark value (for example, 80 kilometres per hour
  4. motorways) irrespective of traffic flow, or traffic flow is relatively high (for example, 2000 vehicles/hour/lane for motorways) in combination with moderately degraded speeds.
  5. This is a new service standard developed to measure how efficiently the Road Operations Program is being operated and delivered. Costs include administration of operations (including managing traffic incidents, heavy vehicle operations and traveller and traffic information), maintenance and projects.
  6. As a new measure, the 2016–17 Target (10 per cent) was an estimate based on limited historical data. Current data suggests that this target may be unobtainable in the short term, and should be considered as a long term aspirational target. The result shows there is a high demand on departmental staff capability in operating the road transportation system. It is expected that over time the figure may remain stable as more effort is put into managing the network through non-infrastructure solutions.TMR is moving to managing the network in smarter ways, and are investing in innovative technologies (including big data and analytics) and systems
  7. manage the network, to ultimately get more out of our existing transport system. With the onset of co-operative ITS, Internet of Things (IoT), big data, cloud technology, advanced analytics there will be an increased demand on departmental road operations people capability and capacity in operating the network using complex systems and technology tools. TMR will continue to deliver a program of road operational system technology enhancements.
  8. Delays can be attributed to scope changes, design issues, wet weather impacts of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie on the diversion of resources to higher priority projects.
  9. The project delays can be attributed to scope changes; design issues; wet weather and the diversion of resources to emergent projects.
  10. This is a new service standard developed to measure how efficiently the four year rolling program of priority transport infrastructure works (the Queensland Transport and Roads Investment Program) is being managed and delivered.

Service Area: Transport Safety and Regulation

Service Area Objective: To regulate the transport system safely, economically and sustainably without imposing unnecessary red tape.

Safety of the transport network is critical to supporting Queensland's future growth. A safe, secure and resilient transport system aims to protect the lives and property of everyone who interacts with the network for business, employment and leisure.

Regulatory and safety related activities undertaken in this service area include:

Service standards Notes 2016–17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual Status
Effectiveness measures 1
Marine fatalities per 100,000 registered vessels regulated in Queensland M, 2, 3 2.96 4.24
Rail fatalities per 100,000 population T 0.10 0.06
Hospitalised rail casualties per 100,000 population T, 4 0.40 0.24
Number of level crossing collision occurrences per 1,000,000 train kilometres travelled T 0.45 0.23
Fatalities per 100,000 population on State-controlled roads M, 5 3.03 3.26
Road fatalities per 100,000 population M 5.05 5.18
Hospitalised road casualties per 100,000 population M 133 129.06
Percentage of vessel movements without serious incidents M
Pilotage areas - 100 100
ReefVTS area - 100 100
Efficiency measures
Cost of rail regulation per 100 kilometres of rail infrastructure T, 6 $20,261 $15,119
Cost of rail regulation per 1,000,000 kilometres of rail operations T, 7 $43,490 $33,924
Direct operational cost of Vessel Tracking Services per monitored vessel movement M, 8 $456 $458
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

T. Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Deputy Premier, Minister for Transport and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning.

M. Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Minister for Main Roads, Road Safety and Ports and Minister for Energy, Biofuels and Water Supply.

  1. The two former material services 'Transport regulation' and 'Transport safety' have been re-merged following agreement with Queensland Treasury and the Department of the Premier and Cabinet that transport safety is a key outcome directly associated with effective regulation.
  2. Under the National System for Domestic Commercial Vessel Safety, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority has assumed regulatory responsibility for the State's domestic commercial vessels. The new service standard excludes vessels that are not regulated under Queensland legislation.
  3. The number of marine fatalities in 2016–17 involving regulated vessels was 11 against an annual estimate of 8. The number of deaths in three of the four quarters was larger than the average expected number of 2 per quarter. Substantial quarter to quarter variation will occur at times given the nature of the variables.
  4. Actual results reflects data available for hospitalisation crashes for the 12 months to 31 December 2016.
  5. The rate for the 12 months ending 30 June 2017 is 3.26 fatalities along state-controlled roads per 100,000 population.
  6. The calculation for this service standard is based on the total number of kilometres of railway track (rail infrastructure) across Queensland in the financial year. Regulation refers to the department's accreditation and compliance role in relation to the activities of rail transport operators including the construction of a railway, railway tracks and associated track structures and the management, commissioning, maintenance, repair, modification, installation, operation or decommissioning of rail infrastructure.
  7. The calculation for this service standard is based on the total number of kilometres travelled by rollingstock in the transportation of passengers and freight across Queensland in the financial year. Regulation refers to the department's accreditation and compliance role in relation to the activities of rail transport operations including the commissioning/decommissioning, maintenance, repair, modification and operation of rollingstock or operating a railway service.
  8. This is a new service standard developed to track the cost of the department delivering Vessel Tracking Services in monitoring vessel movements in Port Pilotages and REEFVTS areas.

Service Area: Customer Experience

Service Area Objective: To put customers at the centre of the delivery of the department's products and services to understand their expectations, improve their experience and reduce rework.

The department is committed to delivering services with a 'customers first' approach, engaging with customers to better understand their needs and behaviours with regard to: roads usage, maritime safety information, licensing services, registration services and passenger transport services.

We will provide flexible delivery methods and channels for customers; including the ability to self-serve online 24/7. This includes undertaking customer research and insights activities to consider customer perspectives, motivations and expectations upfront in guiding the development of all product and service delivery across the department in the future.

Service standards Notes 2016––17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual Status
Effectiveness measures T
Average wait time in Customer Service Centres (minutes) - 8 7:22 -
Percentage of call centre calls answered within three minutes 1 80 69.45
Overall customer satisfaction with transactional services (on a scale of 1 – 10) 2 8 8.2
Customer satisfaction ratings of public transport by service type (using a 0–100 index – 100 being excellent) 3 - -
Whole of Queensland – Taxi 4, 5 ≥68 65
South-east Queensland
Bus - ≥70 72
Rail - ≥70 69
Ferry - ≥70 80
Rest of Queensland
Regional urban bus - ≥70 73
Customer service complaints in SEQ per 10,000 trips - <3 2.57
Efficiency measures
Average unit cost per transaction in a Customer Service Centre 6, 7, 8 $17.68 $19.30
Average cost per customer enquiry – TransLink Contact Centre 9 $4.70 4.53
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

T. Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Deputy Premier, Minister for Transport and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning.

  1. The call centre continues to implement remedial actions to improve performance. These include promotion of self service, migration of customers to online services, the implementation of call steering technology, additional call resources to meet peak demand and ongoing training.
  2. Transactional services include any licensing and registration transactions and enquiries which are handled/processed using the following channels: the department's Customer Service Centres, call centres, website, service agents (Australia Post/BPAY), Smart Service Queensland call centre, mail/fax/email, Queensland Government Agency Program offices, Queensland Police Service stations, and Clerk of the Court locations.
  3. The Customer Satisfaction Survey investigates how customers rate a range of experiences when travelling on public transport services in Queensland. The survey assists the department in identifying and prioritising areas for improvement and allows the department to monitor the impact of service changes, new products and services on customer perceptions.
  4. Customer satisfaction with Queensland taxi services remained stable at 65 (out of a possible 100) in Quarter 4 (one point higher than the previous quarter although not a statistically significant increase) and all ten KPIs remained stable when compared to the previous quarter. Satisfaction with SEQ Taxi remained stable at 65 (out of 100) – one point higher than the previous quarter although not a statistically significant increase. Three KPIs increased (Reliability & Frequency Information and Staff). Satisfaction with regional Queensland Taxi remained stable at 66 (out of 100) and all ten KPIs also remained stable.
  5. Overall satisfaction with Queensland taxis remains stable. However, satisfaction with affordability, information and proximity remain comparatively low and impact on overall satisfaction.
  6. Reporting cycle is every two years in alignment with Corporate Finance ABC Costing Schedule. The next fully calculated average unit cost will be available in early 2017–18.
  7. Costs include training, travel, administration expenses, and nominal cost for information technology, accommodation, shared services provider, and labour (salaries and wages).
  8. Assessment criteria has not been set for this measure, although the result is more than the target set for the 2016–17 it is within acceptable result ranges.
  9. This is a new service standard developed to measure the cost efficiency of providing customer enquiry services through our TransLink contact centre for the passenger transport network.

Service Area: Passenger transport services

Service Area Objective: To lead and shape Queensland's passenger transport system by providing an integrated passenger transport network that allows fair access to all.

This service area facilitates passenger transport systems across the State and aims to provide a single integrated and safe transport system allowing fair access to everyone. Key passenger transport activities managed by this service area include:

Service standards Notes 2016–17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual Status
Wheelchair accessible taxi response times compared to conventional taxi fleet response times T
Peak
Percentage within 18 minutes
Conventional - 85 94
Wheelchair 1 85 86
Percentage within 30 minutes
Conventional - 95 99
Wheelchair 1 95 96
Off peak
Percentage within 10 minutes
Conventional - 85 87
Wheelchair 1, 2 85 73
Percentage within 20 minutes
Conventional - 95 97
Wheelchair 1, 2 95 92
Patronage on Government contracted services (millions) T
South-east Queensland 3 183.21 177.42
Bus 4 115.79 111.70
Rail 5 52.55 51.01
Tram 6 7.8 7.97
Ferry 7 7.07 6.72
Rest of Queensland 8 12.04 11.85
Regional air 9 0.2 0.15
Long distance bus - 0.06 0.06
Regional urban bus - 11.45 11.33
TravelTrain 10 0.33 0.30
Average on-time running performance in peak times – CityTrain 11 95% 94.03%
Percentage of scheduled services delivered – CityTrain 12 99.50 99.46
Efficiency measures
Average subsidy per trip provided through the Taxi Subsidy Scheme - $8.05 $7.74
Average subsidy per passenger on Government contracted services
Regional air 13 $33.40 $49.58
Long distance bus 14 $92.55 $114.97
Regional urban bus - $3.32 $3.34
TravelTrain - $588.11 $597.15
Average cost of subsidy per passenger trip in SEQ – bus, rail, tram and ferry - $7.05 $7.05
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Deputy Premier, Minister for Transport and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning.

  1. The Queensland taxi fleet consists of 3259 taxis of which 642 (20 per cent) are wheelchair accessible taxis. The department notes that minimum service levels are currently not being met, which is possibly due to the announcement of the personalised transport reforms and fewer taxis on the road in off-peak times.
  2. Response times for wheelchair accessible jobs are longer than response times for conventional taxis. This may be due to drivers not prioritising wheelchair work or because they are engaged in providing other services under a contract with other entities such as the Department of Veterans' Affairs.
  3. The lower 2016–17 result can be attributed to rail network issues and a subsequent reduction in services affected patronage. The effects of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie significantly impacted the network resulting in fewer trips across all modes. Fewer Tertiary Concession trips were registered following the introduction of card data matching with bus patronage being impacted more than other modes.
  4. Bus was 3.5 per cent below EOFY budget due to the go study project changing some customers behaviour and leaving the system as they were now required to pay adult fares instead of previously paying a concession fares, Fairer Fares not attracting additional trips onto the bus network, weaker weekend demand due to 'nine and free' being replaced with 'eight and 50 per cent free' travel days, a mode shift from bus to rail following the opening of the Redcliffe Peninsula rail line and heavy rain and flooding in March/April resulting from Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie affecting travel.
  5. Rail was 2.9 per cent below EOFY budget due to the go study project changing some customers behaviour and leaving the system as they were now required to pay adult fares instead of previously paying a concession fares, fairer fares not attracting additional trips on the Train network (this would be mainly as a result of all the negative media about reliability of the network since Oct 2016 weaker weekend demand due to 9 and free being replaced with 8 and 50 per cent free travel days and Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie affecting travel. This was partially offset by a positive increase in rail patronage with the opening of the MBRL line.
  6. The term 'Tram' replaces 'Light Rail' in this measure to better differentiate the service from the term 'Rail' which, in the Service Delivery Statement is used to refer to Heavy Rail.
  7. Ferry was 4.9 per cent below EOFY budget due to the go study project changing some customers behaviour and leaving the system as they were now required to pay adult fares instead of previously paying a concession fares fairer fares not attracting additional trips on the Ferry network weaker weekend demand due to 9 and free being replaced with 8 and 50 per cent impacts from free travel days impacts of Ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie affecting travel and Kingsford Smith Drive development works impacting on network operations due to speed restrictions.
  8. The 2016–17 result can be attributed to the decline in the resource sector and overall economic conditions. Regional air was the mode most impacted with passenger numbers failing to reach expected targets across all air routes.
  9. The 2016–17 result is tracking red with a 40,909 decrease against the target. The result can be attributed to the decline in the resource sector and overall economic conditions. Passenger numbers failed to reach expected targets across all air routes. Central 1 passenger numbers have stabilised at lower levels. Minimal growth expected on all other regional air routes.
  10. Patronage continues to trend unfavourably (over the last five years) reflecting higher competition from other modes which offer shorter travel times and are deemed by the public to be more cost effective alternative transport options.
  11. On time running has been impacted by train crew shortages at Queensland Rail.
  12. Reliability has been impacted by the shortages of train crew at Queensland Rail.
  13. The 2016–17 result is tracking red with a $15.80 increase against the target. The result can also be attributed to reduced patronage related to the decline
  14. the resource sector and a decline in overall economic conditions. The reduction in passenger numbers has led to the flight schedules being significantly reduced on Central 1 resulting in less revenue to the state which increases the average subsidy per passenger.
  15. The 2016–17 result is tracking red with a 24 per cent [$22.42] increase against the target. This result can be attributed to: increase in funding payments (Revenue Sharing Payments) to one operator (five routes); aggressive competition from commercial operators; downturn in the resources sector; completion of infrastructure development; drought.

Service Area: RoadTek

Service Area Objective: RoadTek provides transport infrastructure solutions, including construction and maintenance services to enable the department to deliver on Government priorities and outcomes for the community

As a commercial business unit within the department, RoadTek is instrumental in the delivery of numerous projects on the state's extensive road and bridge network. This includes emergency response and related activities, as well as the delivery of projects that restore infrastructure and services after natural disasters. Details on achievements under this service standard are listed throughout the report.

Service standards Notes 2016–17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual Status
Effectiveness measures
Lost time injury frequency rate 1 <10 11.1
Customers' and stakeholders' value of RoadTek (on a scale of 1 to 5) - >4 4.40
Efficiency measures
Long term debt / equity - 12.1% 10.3
Long term debt / total assets 2 8.5% 6.7
Return on equity 3 7.1% 18.2
Return on revenue (after tax) 4 2.5% 5.3
Profit margin (earnings before income tax / user charges) 5 3.5% 7.5
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

  1. This year's result was good in comparison to the 2015–16 result of 16.5. There were 10 less lost time injuries this year in contrast to 2015–16. The long term trend is on a positive downward trajectory but has plateaued over recent years.
  2. Both long term debt and assets expected to remain steady over the next two years.
  3. Equity position expected to remain steady over the medium term.
  4. Target expected to be similar to 2015–16 Budget figure.
  5. Trading position expected to be similar to 2016–17 Budget result.

Discontinued measures 2018–19

Performance measures included in the 2016–17 Service Delivery Statements that have been discontinued or replaced are reported in the following table. Please refer to the notes below for further information.

Service standards Notes 2016–17 Target / Estimate 2016–17 Actual
Service area: Transport System Investment Planning and Programming
Percentage of projects in the Transport System Planning Program: T, 1 - -
Commencing no later than four months after the programmed commencement date - 90 96
completed no more than four months after the programmed period - 80 81
costing less than 10% over the programmed estimate - 85 94
Road system seal age (percentage of the State-controlled road network exceeding the optimal seal age) M, 1 28.2 29.93
Service area: Transport Safety and Regulation T
Rail fatalities per 100,000 population 2 0.1 0.06
Hospitalised rail casualties per 100,000 population 2 0.4 0.24
Number of level crossing collision occurrences per 1,000,000 train kilometers travelled 2 0.45 0.23
Cost of rail regulation per 100 kilometres of rail infrastructure 2 $20,261 $15,119
Cost of rail regulation per 1000,000 kilometres of rail operations 2 $43,490 $33,924
Service area: Customer Experience
Average wait time in Customer Service Centres (minutes) 3 8 7:22
Percentage of call centre calls answered within three minutes 3 80 69.45
  • On track
  • Slight variance
  • Major issues

Note:

Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Minister for Main Roads, Road Safety and Ports and Minister for Energy, Biofuels and Water Supply.

Denotes service standards for which accountability rests with the Deputy Premier, Minister for Transport and Minister for Infrastructure and Planning.

  1. This is a measure of process, not a measure of effectiveness or efficiency. This measure will continue to be reported in the Department of Transport and Main Roads Annual Report and internally within the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
  2. These measures have been discontinued due to the transition of rail regulatory functions to the Office of the National Rail Safety Regulator (ONRSR) on 1 July 2017.
  3. This is a measure of activity, not a measure of effectiveness or efficiency. This measure will continue to be reported in the internally within the Department of Transport and Main Roads.
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